Every animal gets a full medical screening before setting foot on our transport vans. From getting micro-chipped to ensuring all animals are healthy and recovered from any surgeries, spay/neuters, or other ailments it takes the job of a super Veterinarian. And RPM has a great one!

Dr. Karen Tatum
Position: Staff Veterinarian

1. How long have you worked with RPM? About 8 months
2. What do you do at RPM? I’m the in-house vet and all that it entails: examinations, health certificates for travel, consultations, assisting with medical protocols, minor procedures etc…
3. What does a typical day at RPM look like for you? All things animal health! Talking with and assisting fosters with their animals. Discussing specific cases with RPM staff. A lot of examinations, vaccines, prescribing meds, and occasionally foster education. But mostly assisting with clinic processes, SOPs, lab work and getting ready for Thursday.
4. What made you want to work for RPM? I have previous shelter experience and then working for another nonprofit helped me see that I have a passion for helping homeless animals. I initially thought it would be through high volume spay/neuter but when I developed arthritis I needed to find something related that did not involve surgery.
5. What’s the best part about working for RPM? Seeing the animals leave on Transport Day!
6. What’s the most difficult part about working for RPM? Dealing with distemper outbreaks and everything heartbreaking that goes along with it.
7. What has been your favorite memory working for RPM? There was a box of Boxer puppies that finally went on transport without ever getting sick!
8. What’s something you wish you would have known before you started your job at RPM? That I need my own air conditioner or fan at my desk.
9. How can the public best support RPM as an organization? Simply spread the word, leave positive reviews, education, and become a foster!